Conservative Party Urges New York Legislators to Reject Internet Gambling

Last November, New York State voters authorized a total of seven new casinos in New York State, in part because they were told it would benefit New York's citizens by promoting job growth, increasing aid to schools, and permitting local governments to lower property taxes through revenues generated.  Of course, all of the promises are dependent on additional money being collected by the state.

Recent reports indicate gaming revenues are down this year, because of either the weather or banks being cautious. When revenues decline, entities' dependent on the additional revenues look for other ways to compensate the loss. 

Three states, Nevada, New Jersey and Delaware legalized Internet gambling and New York may consider legalizing it also, just after promoting the building of seven new casinos. 

Internet gambling is a threat to established gambling sites that have rigorous licensing and regulations established by the state designed to prevent money laundering and underage gambling. States also establish regulations to collect taxes to provide what was promised to its citizens.  Gambling on the internet would be unregulated and possibly attract national and international crime syndicates or terrorist organizations intent on hiding money to facilitate the purchase of weapons.

If New York follows Nevada, New Jersey and Delaware by allowing Internet gambling, the job growth promoted in the ballot question approved by voters, in all likelihood, will never materialize.

Internet gambling targets the weak individuals most likely to become gambling addicts since they would be able to gamble at any time on any given day without ever leaving home, thus increasing costs to taxpayers instead of benefiting them.

Internet gambling is a terrible idea and New York state legislators should reject any consideration of bringing it to New York.  In fact, our state legislators should pass a resolution urging the members of Congress to restore the long-standing policy of banning Internet gambling.  The Justice Department – with no public input or Congressional involvement – issued a legal opinion reversing its long-held position that the Wire Act (18 U.S.C. Section 1084) opened the door for states to authorize Internet gambling.


The above post has been provided by the Conservative Party of New York State.


Donate Sign Up

connect

get updates

Liquid syntax error: Error in tag 'subpage' - No such page slug